We will respond’ EU prepares to STRIKE BACK as Trump’s steel war hits bloc ‘very hard’

THE United States’ proposals to slap tariffs on steel imports is hitting Brussels “very hard”, the EU’s trade commissioner has warned.

US President  ordered an investigation into curbing steel imports amid “national security” fears in April. 

Washington is expected to decide whether to impose tariffs this week. 

The investigation has mainly been aimed at cheap imports from  but has sparked concern from European steel exporters who worry they will be targeted by the  crackdown.

The EU’s trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström says Brussels “will need to respond” if Mr Trump decides to impose tariffs on steel from the , China and other countries. 

She told Politico: “We should be very, very clear …. [that] this is hitting the European Union very, very hard.” 

Ms Malmström said the EU will have to analyse Washington’s decision before deciding what action to take. 

UK ‘giving up on steel industry to see growth with China’

 

EU trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström says Brussels “will need to respond” to tariffs

EU trade commissioner Cecilia Malmström says Brussels “will need to respond” to tariffs

She said: “We will have to respond in different means.”

The trade commissioner said the EU shares Mr Trump’s concerns regarding overcapacity in China.

She warned US tariffs are “maybe not targeted vis-à-vis Europe, but it will hit us very hard.”

Donald Trump ordered an investigation into curbing steel imports in AprilEPA

Donald Trump ordered an investigation into curbing steel imports in April

Steel

EU lawmakers proposed toughening new rules to guard against cheap Chinese imports on Tuesday in a vote exposing a shift to a more guarded stance towards free trade in Europe.

The European Parliament’s international trade committee voted overwhelmingly in favour of a text that would give the EU greater scope to impose duties on products coming from countries where the state interferes with the economy.

An EU-China summit this month was overshadowed by divisions on trade, with Brussels still wrestling over Beijing’s demand that it be treated as a “market economy” 15 years after the Asian nation joined the World Trade Organisation.